The Golden Door: 14 Stories of Wisdom, Justice, and Love

The Golden Door is a collection of stories showing the impact on people when they’re treated as “the other,” whether they’re immigrants to a country, a group of targeted within their own country, or something else besides. The title refers to Emma Lazarus’s welcoming words inscribed on the plaque on Statue of Liberty, “I lift my lamp beside the golden door!”

Tales of mistreatment of “the other” abound in historical or religious writings from around the world and through all time. But there are also plenty of examples of people helping each other, caring for one another, learning about each other. Sometimes in big ways, sometimes in small—but they all add up.

All proceeds will be donated to Doctors Without Borders and the ACLU.

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The Stories

In Adrianne Aron’s “The Envelope Trick,” an immigrant learns the very system that’s helping him in his new country is also hurting him.

A woman and her young daughter escape death in their home country, only to find themselves separated at the U.S. border in Steve Carr’s “Needle in a Haystack.”

During the Cuban Missile Crisis, a young boy who dreams of emigrating to the U.S. to study at MIT comes across a pair of Soviet officers, and learns there’s more at stake than he’d ever dreamed in Tonya D. Price’s “Spy in the Sky.”

In Lesley L. Smith’s “Ke’s Symphony,” a family of aliens, refugees who escaped a disaster on their own world, is welcomed with both friendship and fear on the planet that took them in.

The president of the United States wishes for peace in “The Un-American President,” by Jason Dias. Sometimes integrity is doing the right thing because everyone is watching.

A little girl leaves her war-torn home with her parents, and learns that life is built on small kindnesses in Bonnie Elizabeth’s “A Used Pair of Shoes.”

Hedi Framm Anton’s “La Despedida” shows two sides of a story of farewell. A young girl lives with her grandmother in Honduras; they wait for a check from her mother, who works in San Francisco, so they can pay the fee the gang members demand every month.

Below the pristine mountains of Portugal’s countryside, a war rages on in Rei Rosenquist’s “Friends.” Thrown together in a dismal war camp, imported refugees share nothing but their suffering. No common culture. No common tongue. But friendship can spring up even in the toughest of times.

An American temporarily loses his sight in an accident in Beirut in Bob Sojka’s “Transient Pains.” While recovering, he tells his nurse stories about growing up in an immigrant family in Chicago in the 1950s, where stereotyped animosities arose among people of different origins.

In Adrianne Aron’s “Like a Snake,” an American is surprised to learn that the man she meets in a poor rural village that doesn’t even have electricity has two sons going to Mission High School in San Francisco. But is it really a surprise?

Jamie Ferguson’s “Something in Common” takes place in a small town in western Pennsylvania in 1910 where a young woman discovers she and a recent immigrant from Austria-Hungary have more in common than she’d realized.

A wealthy actress in Hollywood in the 1920s takes on a pair of immigrant faeries as indentured servants in DeAnna Knippling’s “Myrna and the Thirteen-Year Witch,” but she didn’t realize just how high the cost would be to keep them safe.

In Rob Vagle’s “Dispatch from the Other Side,” a young man who was separated from his family while trying to claim asylum in America follows the instructions on a postcard sent by his long-lost mother, and discovers things about his family he’d never expected to find.

A young woman, who moved from Afghanistan to California with her brother, has to make an important decision in David Stier’s “The Path.” Her choice will change both of their lives, forever.

Inspiration for the title “The Golden Door”

The title for this collection comes from the sonnet “The New Colossus,” which was written by Emma Lazarus in 1883 to raise money for the construction of a pedestal for the Statue of Liberty.

Not like the brazen giant of Greek fame,

With conquering limbs astride from land to land;

Here at our sea-washed, sunset gates shall stand

A mighty woman with a torch, whose flame

Is the imprisoned lightning, and her name

MOTHER OF EXILES. From her beacon-hand

Glows world-wide welcome; her mild eyes command

The air-bridged harbor that twin cities frame.

“Keep, ancient lands, your storied pomp!” cries she

With silent lips. “Give me your tired, your poor,

Your huddled masses yearning to breathe free,

The wretched refuse of your teeming shore.

Send these, the homeless, tempest-tost to me,

I lift my lamp beside the golden door!”


—“The New Colossus,” by Emma Lazarus

New release: Entangled by Midsummer!

Jamie Ferguson’s contemporary fantasy novel, Entangled by Midsummer, is now available!


 
 
Bound by betrayal, entangled in enchantment.

Mark is living a selkie’s worst nightmare: the enchanted skin that lets him turn into a seal has been stolen by his wily human lover. Now he’s trapped on land, slowly losing his mind as his chances to return to the sea slip away.

His only hope? A faery woman named Merenna.

But Merenna has her own problems. She’s hiding in the mortal world to escape the most dangerous lord of Faerie—a man whose ambitions would make her his bride and his pawn. Now his minions have caught up to her, and Mark finds himself entangled in the deadly power games of faeries.

It will take every bit of skill, cunning, and luck Mark and Merenna possess just to stay ahead of their pursuers. The net of intrigue closes in around them as Midsummer approaches—a time when vast forces align, sinister plans come to fruition, and destiny itself can be rewritten.

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Excerpt

It must have been years, maybe even decades, since anyone else had been up in the attic of Katy’s house on the Oregon coast—which made it the perfect place for Mark to hide the thing that mattered more to him than anything else in the world—his sealskin.

Mark pulled himself up off the last rung of the rickety ladder that led from the second story of the little Victorian. He was happy to be on the much more reliable attic floor. Dust sparkled in the beam of sunlight that shone through the tiny window in the gable. He wiped his hands on his jeans and tried not to sneeze.

The airy space was filled with a random assortment of things: dried flowers, a large collection of umbrellas, rolled-up rugs, piles of clothes and blankets, a child’s high chair, a wooden trunk. Everything was covered with a layer of dust. The dust was so thick he couldn’t clearly make out his previous footprints on the floor, even though he’d walked across it less than a month before.

Mark had had a fun few weeks with Katy since he’d met her at the end of May, but it was only a few days until Midsummer, and he was ready to move on. He wanted to get up to the aquarium in Seattle by July, and there were a lot of seaside spots to visit along the way.

Besides, sooner or later she’d get too attached, and there was no way he could possibly tell her he was a selkie.

The old pine boards creaked as he walked across the attic. His flip-flops made soft smacking sounds on the wood floor, and dust rose up from his footsteps like little puffs of smoke. A seagull cawed outside, its cry muffled by the thick walls. The faint sound of the waves on the other side of the cliff was familiar and comforting.

He itched to spend a few days in his seal form. He hadn’t worn it since the day he’d met Katy. And it had been far too long since he’d felt the sea’s embrace.

It had all started in Newport at the Oregon Coast Aquarium. He had been in the pinniped enclosure discussing the usual topics with the seals, things like whether or not the water temperature was to their liking, what kinds of fish were they being fed, where they’d hid the toy a kid had dropped in their pen the other day. Mark hated that he couldn’t free them, hated that his cousins had to stay penned up, but he knew if he did help them escape, other seals would only be captured in their stead. So he spent time every year visiting aquariums along the western coast to make sure the seals and sea lions were being treated well.

Then Katy had come up to him. She’d said she was a botanist doing research with the aquarium, and that she liked to look at the seals—but Mark knew women, and he knew why she had really stopped. She had the red curls of a temptress, wore a blue sweater that was tight in just the right places, and her smile promised fun. She’d been easy to charm—as they always were.

He’d spent that night at her house, and hid his sealskin in her attic the next day. He’d only planned to stay a few days, but had found Katy to be quite fun. If it hadn’t been for the itch of the sea, he might have stayed even longer.

Mark reached the pile of blankets and coats and sweaters he’d hidden his skin in. It was about the size of a down comforter, and weighed quite a bit more than any blanket. He smiled as he knelt down and began to rummage through them, the musty scent of old fabric tickling his nose. It was going to feel so good to be back in the water. Swimming in his human form just wasn’t the same.

He pulled the last blanket aside, the plaid wool rough against his skin.

The bare wooden floor stared back at him.

No sealskin.

He must have missed it. He pressed his lips together. He went through the pile again, pulling every piece out one by one and placing it on the floor.

But his sealskin wasn’t there.

Mark sat back on his heels, chills running down his back.

He took a deep breath, stood up, and looked around. There must be another stack of blankets. The attic was filled to the gills with crap. He must have put it somewhere else. He must have.

Except he knew he hadn’t. It was part of him. He always knew exactly where he’d hidden it. He’d put it right here, in the northwest corner of the attic, in the pile with the green argyle sweater on top.

Mark stood as still as if he were frozen, all the old tales coming back to him about female selkies having their skins stolen, and then being forced to marry human men and never return to the sea.

That couldn’t be him.

That wouldn’t be him.

He must have moved it. Or perhaps he’d put it behind a box, or under the umbrellas, and had merely forgotten.

He searched the next pile, then the next, throwing winter coats, faded dresses made of taffeta and lace, and multi-colored afghans aside. Clouds of dust filled the air and tickled the back of his throat. He ripped open box after box, threw the umbrellas across the room, shook out every blanket. He tossed the contents of the old trunk onto the floor. He scoured the room, moving faster and faster, leaving a trail of clutter in his wake. He smacked his head on the low beams, but barely noticed. He pulled down the dried flowers and herbs that hung from the rafters, unrolled the old rugs, flung aside shirts, dresses, shoes, went through every bag and box and stack and pile.

Where was it? It was his!

It was him.

And without it, he could never return to the sea.

Finally, he fell to his hands and knees on the pine floor, his face wet with tears. His breath came in huge gasps, and his T-shirt clung to his sweat-drenched body.

He knelt there, his head hanging down, until his breathing slowed. Empty cardboard boxes, rumpled newspapers, and old clothing littered the room. He pushed himself to his feet, wiped his face on his shirt, and walked back across the room to the attic hatch. Dried leaves crunched under his flip-flops. He climbed down the ladder, lifted the folding steps back up toward the ceiling, and pressed the door shut. A few stray pieces of paper had fallen through the hole, so he picked them up and put them in the recycling bin in the kitchen. He grabbed his packed duffle bag up from next to the front door, put his things back in the bedroom closet, and waited for Katy to come home.

That evening over dinner, he said, “I’ve lost something in the house. A kind of coat.”

Katy smiled, and said, “I know.”

Find Jamie

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Find Entangled by Midsummer

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Water Faeries: 15 Tales of Mermaids, Kelpies, and Magical Water Creatures

Jump into the water and enter the world of Faerie!

On a rock by the shore sits a mermaid fair
Dreaming of her lost lover as she combs her hair

Kelpies, and selkies, and the great snakes of the sea
All stop and listen as she sings of a love never to be

For the sailor she saved from those dark, storm-tossed waves
Got back on his ship, and sailed away

Now the mermaid’s alone, with broken-hearted dreams
And far, far away the sailor stares out at the sea

~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~

What if the Loch Ness monster is more than a myth?

Where did the Lady of the Lake go after leaving Avalon?

Can a mermaid ever truly leave the sea, and follow her lover to land?

This collection includes fifteen tales about sirens, kelpies, mermaids, sea monsters, naiads, and other enchanted creatures of the water.

Enjoy the magic and wonder of these watery tales of Faerie!

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The Stories

Lina asks the sea to return her fisherman husband in Jaime Lee Moyer’s “Ocean Daughters.” A mermaid comes to shore to answer Lina’s call, and offers a bargain…but is Lina willing to pay the price?

In modern day New Hampshire Guinevere, now a blacksmith, and the Lady of the Lake, guard King Authur’s magic sword in Karen L. Abrahamson’s “The Lady of Ashuelot.” When Lancelot arrives and demands the sword back it distrubs the peace the two women have built. Now Guinevere must decide whether to spend the magic of the sword to revive Arthur and Camelot, or to preserve her modern world.

In “The Best Disguises,” by Grayson Towler, Moira heads to Scotland to search for the Loch Ness monster, and to prove to herself that the friend—and monster—she’d met when visiting Scotland as a child had actually been real. What she finds is unexpected…because sometimes the best disguises are so good that you sometimes forget who you really are.

Trapped on an island with an abusive husband, Selene struggles with her fear of the sea every day in “I Sing a Song of Mourning,” by Dayle A. Dermatis. But when her husband abandons her to drown, the mermaids give Selene the power to exact her revenge. How she chooses to use that power—and how she faces her fear—will change her life forever.

After the Christians riot in front of Dionysus’ temple in Thea Hutcheson’s “Coming into the Iron Age,” Mneme, a water muse, and the satyr Krotos head to the mountains to escape. All the old gods have scattered, and the rest have faded into obscurity. What kind of life can a water muse live in this new age of iron?

John falls asleep while sailing in the Virgin Islands, and wakes up to find himself in the middle of the ocean, with land nowhere in sight, in Jamie Ferguson’s “Learning to Sail.” With no safety equipment, and no way to determine which direction land lies, he prepares for his impending doom…and then a mermaid appears in the water next to his boat.

Anthea Sharp’s “The Sea King’s Daughter” goes deep beneath the Irish Sea, where a kingdom beyond mortal men’s imagining lies. The daughter of the Sea King journeys to the surface, and leaves her tail behind so the fisherman she’s fallen in love with believes she’s a beautiful maiden washed ashore. She cannot speak to him in any voice, though her yearning shines from her eyes. But with forces of land and sea arrayed between them, will the couple ever find their happy ending?

Oz heads to a seaside town in Ireland to take photos of the wee folk at the bequest of his grandmother’s will in Brenda Carre’s “The Selkie’s Treasure.” Fairies don’t exist, of course, so he knows his quest is futile…or is it?

A mermaid falls in love with the man she rescued from the sea in “Blood and Water” by Alethea Kontis. She’s willing to pay any price to be with him, for she loves him more than life itself. But is the price of love too high?

Louisa Swann’s “Verbena Draws First Blood” is the tale of a deadly sorceress and powerful necromancer who heads to a lake high in the mountains to thwart her nemesis. But she didn’t expect the lake to contain a kelpie…

Three days after Japanese torpedoes hit the USS Indianapolis, Gordie is one of some six hundred US Navy sailors slowly dying in the middle of the Pacific Ocean in Brigid Collins’ “The Road Beneath Indianapolis.” There’s no food, nothing to drink but salt water, and sharks are feeding off the men. Or are they really sharks?

It’s 1934 in DeAnna Knippling’s “Of Drought and Harsh Moonlight.” Claudine lives in a small town stricken by drought and poverty. Change arrives when a sweet-faced, dark- haired, whistling man shows up…but why did he come to town? And how did he know the new bridge had been destroyed when the newspaper hadn’t come out yet?

Linda Jordan’s “Awakening” tells the story of Merial who, just before her sixteenth birthday, learns she’s only half naiad—the father she’s never seen is a dryad. She leaves the water and heads for the forest to find him, and finally understands who she really is.

In Deb Logan’s “Selkies in Paradise,” the seers Artie and Jed are on their honeymoon in Hawaii, far away from the terrors they’ve fought together in other parts of the world. They come across a sad young woman staring out to sea, and realize she’s a selkie—but her sealskin has been stolen, and she can no longer return to the water.

Hagen von der Lahn goes on a treasure hunt in the deepest gorge in France in Sharon Kae Reamer’s “A Recipe for Disaster.” But the historian he’s working with is searching for a different kind of treasure, one which involves poison, an ancient knife, and tangling with a river guardian.

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A Procession of Faeries

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Innocence and Deceit: 14 Fairy Tales Retold, Reimagined, and Reinvented

Enter the magical, unpredictable, wonderful world of fairy tales!

What if Cinderella was the wicked one, and manipulated her kind, loving stepmother and stepsisters?

Is being a handsome, charming prince really as effortless and trouble-free as it seems?

Would you be alarmed if you realized that the beautiful red shoes you’re admiring change their appearance to appeal to whoever is looking at them?

And speaking of shoes, how did Cinderella manage to dance in glass slippers without them breaking and slicing her feet to shreds?

Innocence and Deceit, the second volume in the Ever After Fairy Tales anthology series, contains fourteen fairy tales retold, reimagined, and reinvented.

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The Stories

After the fairy king grants him the feline body he’s always longed for, Tobi upholds his end of the bargain by serving as messenger between the fairy court and the powerful wizard Baba Yaga in “Claws at Hand,” by Brigid Collins. But there’s one thing that could make Tobi lose his hard-earned cathood…

In “The Fennigsan’s Challenge,” by Stefon Mears, Lloxup is robbed and left for dead, and then comes across the Fennigsan, the legendary Dark Lady of the Woods. If he passes her challenge, her power could change his life. But failure means death.

Valentina overhears a strange conversation between another couple in Jamie Ferguson’s “Inside a Fairy Tale.” Filled with foreboding, Valentina follows them, and finds herself inside a modern-day fairy tale.

The Lizard Horses,” by Leah Cutter, is set in modern-day Hungary. Jelek loves reading old myths and legends, like the stories of Hungarian wizards, how they only drink milk and always carry around weighty spell books. But what if some myths are true?

In “The Red Stilettos,” by Sharon Kae Reamer,Caitlin is backstage at a music competition when one of the performers collapses. The unfortunate woman wears a beautiful pair of red stilettos Caitlin realizes she herself desires so strongly there must be something supernaturally bad about them.

Some people blame poor Prince Charming for throwing Cinderella into the dungeon, having little Snow White beheaded, and ordering Sleeping Beauty to be burned at the stake. But “True Love (or the Many Brides of Prince Charming) ,” by Todd Fahnestock and Giles Carwyn, tells us the other side of the story…

Philip doesn’t find a bride fast enough to suit his father in Deb Logan’s “Beauty or Butterface?” so the king writes Philip’s marriage into a treaty with the neighboring kingdom. Philip just has to choose between the other king’s twin daughters. What could be easier?

A visit to one of her favorite childhood places gives Cecily one last chance to find the magic she lost growing up in Annie Reed’s “Chance of Bunnies and Occasional Toad.” Not only for herself, but for her aunt, a free spirit who taught Cecily the value of imagination.

In “If the Shoe Fits” by Dayle A. Dermatis, is Prince Charming really interested in Cinderella…or was it her shoes that captured his attention?

Korshan falls and cuts her knee on a hidden rock in Diana Benedict’s “City of Nowhere in the World.” Korshan seeks the shaman to ask for salve for her knee, not realizing what magical adventures await her.

Connor and his brother are on their way to get ice cream in DeAnna Knippling’s “Doctor Rudolfo Meets his Match.” They come across a strange antique shop…so strange they find themselves inside of it after turning to walk away.

In Karen L. Abrahamson’s “Like Wind Over Water,” Romy left her mermaid form to search for her beloved. Five years later, on a ship heading up the Canadian coast, she finally finds him—and learns his secret.

Cinderella’s stepmother gets the chance to tell her side of the story and explain what really happened in Pam McCutcheon’s “After the Ball.”

Mellie blames fairy tales for ruining her life in Kristine Grayson’s “The Charming Way.” She wants to keep this from happening to other people by forcing booksellers to stop selling fairy tales. Then she runs into a handsome, book-loving man…who also happens to be Prince Charming.

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Ever After Fairy Tales

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Doorway into Faerie: Sixteen Tales of Magic and Enchantment

Step through the portal and enter the world of Faerie.

What if you followed a path through a city park, and found yourself in another land? What if the archway you just passed is really a portal to Faerie? What if the guardian of an opening into our world has perished, and left the doorway unattended?

If you catch a glimpse of the Faery Queen
Consider whether you should remain unseen
If you come across a faery ring
Listen to the wind laugh, and murmur and sing
But beware, for if you enter the world of the Fae
You may have no choice but to stay…

Walk through the doorway and into sixteen different worlds of magic and enchantment in the third volume of the anthology series A Procession of Faeries.

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The Stories

Sidewynd,” by Alexandra Brandt, takes us to Edinburgh, Scotland. Born of two worlds but important to neither, Sky Patel balances life between her beloved city and its mirror in the faerie realm known as the Wynd. But everything changes with the retirement of her friend and mentor—and sole protector of Edinburgh’s Old Town.

Now, despite her best intentions, Sky finds her careful balance cracking. And she may be called to do more—and be more—than she could ever believe possible.

In “Midnight Thread,” by Brigid Collins, Cassandra keeps the spiders’ way, carrying a spool of midnight thread to repair the web she’d strung along the ley line. She’d planned to catch the lake pixies when they swarmed at the end of the summer, but had been foiled by her sister, who insisted on creating “art” with one of the pixies. Reduced to dining on moths, Cassandra learns something new and surprising about her own sister.

Lodie is dying, and takes her beloved horse out for one last ride in Diana Benedict’s “Dancing in the Moonlight.” They come across the queen of the faeries, who is following the ley line on the way to her summer court. Even with her magic the queen cannot cure Lodie, but she offers Lodie her heart’s desire.

In Annie Reed’s “How We Danced,” the stroke that robbed Claudia of the use of her body left something magical behind—a doorway to the Other Place. A happy place where she can escape the limitations of the real world for a little while.

If only she had someone to share it with.

Someone who would take her dancing.

The Good Neighbors,” by DeAnna Knippling, is set in the small town of East Smithville where nobody knew why some people, on foggy nights, just flat-out disappeared.

Or rather, everyone knew why. The fairies took people.

The question was: how did the fairies decide who to take?

Tamara is bespelled by a faerie curse, framed for stealing a baby, and watches her boyfriend get spirited away by the beguiling fae bitch in Dayle A. Dermatis’ “At the Mirk and Midnight Hour.”

But Tamara isn’t someone who takes this sort of shit lying down.

She has a legacy to uphold, and a boyfriend to rescue…and a secret that will rock both the faerie and mundane worlds.

Detective Ron Conroy gave up hoping for a better world a long time ago in Karen L. Abrahamson’s “With One Shoe“. When he attends the dilapidated home of Elvira Paradis to investigate the disappearance of her daughter, he finds not only a woman worn beyond her years, but also visions of someplace—else. Someplace wonderful.

A delinquent youth becomes the primary suspect and takes Ron into the world of high school art classes, unrequited love and lost hope. Will the investigation result in the arrest of the wrong man—or rekindle Ron’s faith?

It’s hard to believe something as small as a sneeze can change the world, but that’s exactly what happens in Louisa Swann’s “One Good Sneeze.” Chiaroscuro Addicott Settlemire Moss didn’t believe in faeries, even though Da had always insisted they were real. And then Chia’s world turned upside down the day she found herself in the Land of the Infamous Fae.

In Lisa Silverthorne’s “Dust,” Club Oberon is an opulent dance club where bands of beautiful, vacuous fey hung out when they weren’t on Portland’s streets—stealing human souls. They lured humans to the exclusive downtown club with a pinch and a promise: a pinch of fey dust and a promise of Tír na nÓg’s riches if they’d only take that one last step…into oblivion.

In “To Have…and To Hold,” by Deb Logan, Artie Woodward and Jed Kendrick have fallen in love and plan to marry. But when Jed’s Irish grandmother invites them to visit her in Dublin, they discover what their shared ability to see the creatures they call “Terrors” really means. They are Seers. They can see the Fae…but the Fae don’t like being seen. When Jed is kidnapped and ensorcelled by the Faery Queen, Artie must use every skill she has to rescue the man she loves!

The Gothic mansion in Brenda Carre’s “Venom” would be the perfect place to haunt if there were such things as ghosts. But Marietta knows ghosts aren’t real, since her stupid sister hasn’t come back to haunt her. She wheedles her way into the house to talk with the old woman who lives there, hoping to find something of worth. But instead she learns about venom, which can be useful in so many ways…

Koko and Shacho are living in the ruins of civilization in Japan after a world war in Rei Rosenquist’s “Along These Lines.” Koko goes in search of the Magician, a magical being who had provided a spell to stop the hydrogen bomb and end the wars. Only that was a fairy tale, a story Shacho told on good days. The Magician wasn’t real.

Except the Magician was real after all.

In Linda Jordan’s “At the Crossroads,” Maureen is spending a year in Ireland after the deaths of her grandmother and parents. She’s rented a cottage next to the woods, unaware that her cottage stands at the crossroads of her world and Faerie.

Brea’s mother had not been a normal human woman, but a mystery born of water and starlight in Anthea Sharp’s “Waterborne.” Brea’s soul stirs with a fierce longing for more. She leaves her village after the death of her father, and searches for answers…and for home.

We go back to 1969 in Jamie Ferguson’s “And Then There Are Cats.” Abby had been looking forward to watching the landing of the Apollo 11 lunar module on television, but her orange tabby cat Neill snuck out the screen door, so she’s spending her day chasing after him instead. He runs across the street, into the city park, and down a path Abby hasn’t seen before. Finally Neill leaps off the path and into a small meadow in the middle of a forest…except Abby knows there’s no forest anywhere near the city…

In Sharon Kae Reamer’s “Night Shepherd,” Juliette von der Lahn does biogenetics research late at night in the University of Cologne biology lab. In addition to working on her doctorate, she uses her magic to clone hybrid animals with special properties. One night a korrigan appears in the lab and tells Juliette that the night shepherd, a creature out of Breton Celtic legend, has perished. But these mythical creatures don’t just die, they transform. And they get hungry. Juliette has no idea how to clone the night shepherd, but with the veil open and the irresistible scent of human blood in the air, she’d better learn fast.

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A Procession of Faeries

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Bundle Up: Creating and Promoting Story and Book Collections

Your all-purpose guide for anthologies, boxed sets, and ebook bundles!

Do you want to put together an anthology, boxed set, or ebook bundle, but aren’t sure where to start, nor how to effectively handle promotion? Or are you an author interested in collaborating with other authors on a project, but don’t know what this will entail?

Whether you’re creating a collection or an author participating in one, Bundle Up! can help you! The more aware you are of what’s involved, the more efficient and productive you—and the project—will be.

Today’s software tools make it faster and easier to create collections of stories and books than ever before. They also provide new and innovative ways to create—and promote—these projects.

If you’re an author and are considering participating in a multi-author collection, this book will provide you information about what to expect, how to contribute to promotion, and how to make the most out of your participation in the project.

If you’re a curator organizing a multi-author collection, this book will walk you through the many decisions you’ll need to make and will help you make your project more efficient and successful.

About the Author

Jamie has curated ten multi-author collections and is working on many more, including a monster-themed anthology series she’s co-editing with DeAnna Knippling. She’s also a member of the Uncollected Anthology, an urban and contemporary fantasy author collective, which she joined in the spring of 2018.

She loves creating colorful spreadsheets and has spent her day job career working in software. She’s worked as a developer, product manager, engineering manager, and is currently working as a technical program manager at a large, high-tech company where she creates order out of chaos.

In her fiction, Jamie focuses on getting into the minds and hearts of her characters, whether she’s writing about a saloon girl in the Old West, a man who discovers the barista he’s in love with is a naiad, or a ghost who haunts the house she was killed in—even though that house no longer exists.

Jamie lives in Colorado and spends her free time in a futile quest to wear out her two border collies, since she hasn’t given in and gotten them their own herd of sheep. Yet.

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The NaNoWriMo Writing Tools bundle!

It’s that time of year: November is “NaNoWriMo” or National Novel Writing Month, when ambitious authors take the challenge to write the first draft of a novel from start to finish in a month. While gearing up for the challenge, writers are looking for advice, techniques, and resources.

Kevin J. Anderson has put together the NaNoWriMo Writing Tools bundle, an impressive collection of a dozen books on writing that will be inspirational, helpful, maybe even provocative. You can get all of the books for as little as $15. This bundle is only available through the end of November 2018, so grab it now—and write your novel!

A portion of the proceeds goes directly to benefit the Challenger Center for Space Science Education, a non-profit group created by the families of the crew of the Challenger shuttle.
Challenger Center and its global network of Challenger Learning Centers use space-themed simulated learning and role-playing strategies to help students bring their classroom studies to life and cultivate skills needed for future success, such as problem solving, critical thinking, communication and teamwork.

 

Become a Successful Indie Author is a motivational guide based on Craig Martelle’s two-and-a-half-million published words. This book will help you see past the hurdles that are keeping you from climbing the mountain of success.

Once you’ve become successful, you never have to work again—or so many people believe. But becoming a success is just the start. Staying a success is the hard part. Kristine Kathryn Rusch’s book The Secrets of Success will help you both become a success and remain one.

Struggling to start your story or lost in the middle? You need a Story Pitch, which is a powerful tool meant to be used when pre-writing and writing. It can help you jumpstart your novel, screenplay, comic, or whatever type of story you are trying to tell and it can be used as a corrective measure if you get off track during the writing process. If you like honesty, no bull, a bunch of humor, and tons of examples in your writing guides, then you’ll love Scott King’s Story Pitch.

Are you an author who is struggling with finding volunteers and professionals to help polish your book? Do you wish there was a guide that offered plenty of suggestions for finding these people? Andrea Pearson’s How to Polish Your Manuscript into a Rock-Solid Book gives you advice and guidance on building your brand, publishing, and marketing your own books.

Writing is not a physically healthy job, but if you want a long-term writing career, then you need to look after your body. In The Healthy Writer, Joanna Penn shares her personal journey and insights with you; her co-author, Dr. Euan Lawson, shares his insights into how you can reduce pain, improve health and build a writing career for the long term.

Whether you’re creating a story or book collection, or are an author participating in one, Jamie Ferguson’s Bundle Up! can help you! The more aware you are of what’s involved, the more efficient and productive you—and your project—will be.

Dean Wesley Smith’s How to Write a Novel in Ten Days is a series of blog posts he wrote while chronicling his process toward ghost writing a 70,000-word novel for a traditional publisher in just ten days. This book takes readers on a journey that demonstrates that writing fast, and writing well, comes from motivation and practice.

You Must Write, by Kevin McLaughlin, explains what Robert Heinlein’s Rules are, and how they can help you bring your craft and career to the next level. This book provides a series of practical lessons, each with exercises designed to help writers build the Rules into their own work-flow. Heinlein’s Rules focus on unleashing the most creative elements of our minds, combating our deepest and most crippling fears, and driving past the greatest obstacles most writers face to reach success.

In Writing as a Team Sport, Kevin J. Anderson and Rebecca Moesta describe various collaboration methods with frank recollections of their own experiences. You’ll learn collaborative techniques that will suit any sort of writer, as well as the pitfalls you may encounter.

You too can create stories at the speed of the great pulp writers. Not only that, but your craft will actually get better the faster you go. It just takes time and practice. In Pulp Speed for Professional Writers, you’ll learn the things Blaze Ward discovered as he went from writing at mundane rates to Pulp Speed.

Series are fun to read, lots of authors write them, they’re great for large worlds and big stories, some publishers love them, and if you do it right, you can create a loyal fan base. Yet they are hard to stay consistent in. Why is that? And how do we do the idea of an epic story justice? The How-To Structure Workbook for Trilogies, Series, and Parallel Worlds by C. Michelle Jefferies helps you learn that series writing is not as hard as it can appear.

Simon Haynes has been writing and publishing novels and short fiction for almost twenty years. How to Write a Novel contains everything he’s learned about writing a novel, both as an indie and as a trade-published author.

 

Get all twelve writing guides in the NaNoWriMo Writing Tools bundle!

Available through the end of November 2018.

 

New release: Beauty and Wickedness

Dangerous spirits lurk in the woods
A bargain can bind a soul
Enchanted sleep can only be broken by true love’s kiss…

You know these things are true…even in this modern world. Your heart still recognizes the power and mystery you can only find in a fairy tale.

In Beauty and Wickedness, the first volume in the anthology series Ever After Fairy Tales, sixteen authors retell and reimagine some of the most enchanting fairy tales ever told. Within these pages, you’ll find beauty and treachery, magic and courage, innocence and wickedness…and at least some happy endings.

Come and lose yourself in the delights and dangers of Beauty and Wickedness.

Amazon ~ iBooks ~ Kobo ~ Barnes & Noble ~ Books2Read

New release: Midwinter Fae

Midwinter Fae, the second volume in the series A Procession of Faerie, is a collection of stories about faeries and magic at Midwinter.

On the day of the shortened sun
A battle between two kings has begun.
The old year dies, and the Oak King rules
We celebrate with logs of Yule!
But the Holly King is defeated, not dead
To Caer Arianrhod he heads.
Until Midsummer, when they battle again
And the Holly King will once again reign…

 
 
Available at: Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Kobo | iBooks | Books2Read

Learn more about the collection at: Facebook | Goodreads

New release: Stars in the Darkness


Stars in the Darkness is a collection of stories about why being just matters, and what the ramifications are for individuals, groups, towns, countries, or even worlds if justice is not expected, encouraged, or enforced.

The stories cover a wide range, from historical fiction to fantasy to alternate realities. Every tale, whether set in ancient Egypt, in a future where only the rich can afford to increase their children’s intelligence through genetic engineering, or about a man turned into a zombie by accident, sends a message about what matters. These stories show bravery, compassion, courage—and consequences.

All proceeds from this collection will be donated to the Southern Poverty Law Center and the Human Rights Campaign.

Available on Amazon, iBooks, Kobo, Barnes & Noble, and Books2Read.

Learn more about the anthology on Facebook and Goodreads.